Feb 212014
 

An Analysis By The Wall Street Journal Found That Many Americans That Reside In Rural, Poorer Areas Of The Country Face Limited Health Options And High Premiums On The ObamaCare Exchange. “Hundreds of thousands of Americans in poorer counties have few choices of health insurers and face high premiums through the online exchanges created by the health-care law, according to an analysis by The Wall Street Journal of offerings in 36 states.” (Timothy W. Martin and Christopher Weaver, “For Many, Few Health-Plan Choices, High Premiums On Online Exchanges,” The Wall Street Journal, 2/13/14)

  • “Consumers In 515 Counties, Spread Across 15 States, Have Only One Insurer Selling Coverage Through The Online Marketplaces, The Journal Found.” (Timothy W. Martin and Christopher Weaver, “For Many, Few Health-Plan Choices, High Premiums On Online Exchanges,” The Wall Street Journal, 2/13/14)

An Office Manager In Rural Florida, The Cost Of A Midlevel Plan Was About $200 More Expensive That A Similar Plan Offered In Tampa. “Rebecca Stephens, an office manager from Wauchula, Fla., recently discovered there was only one health insurer offering coverage in rural, low-income Hardee County, and the midlevel plan she wanted to buy cost about $200 more a month than a similar plan in nearby Tampa.” (Timothy W. Martin and Christopher Weaver, “For Many, Few Health-Plan Choices, High Premiums On Online Exchanges,” The Wall Street Journal, 2/13/14)

  • Rebecca Stephens: “That It Costs Me More For Health Insurance Than Someone In Tampa Doesn’t Seem Equal To Me.” “‘That it costs me more for health insurance than someone in Tampa doesn’t seem equal to me,’ said Ms. Stephens.” (Timothy W. Martin and Christopher Weaver, “For Many, Few Health-Plan Choices, High Premiums On Online Exchanges,” The Wall Street Journal, 2/13/14)

For A Small Business Owner In Rural Georgia, The Cost Of Coverage On The ObamaCare Exchange Is Unaffordable. If Lee Mullins lived in Pittsburgh, he could buy mid-level health coverage for his family for $940 a month. If he lived in Beverly Hills, he would pay $1,405. But Mullins, who builds custom swimming pools, lives in southwest Georgia. Here, a similar health plan for his family of four costs $2,654 a month. This largely agrarian pocket of Georgia, where peanuts and pecans are major crops and hunters bag alligators up to 10 feet long, is one of the most expensive places in the nation to buy health insurance through the new online marketplaces created by the federal health law.” (Jordan Rau, “In Rural Georgia, Federal Health Insurance Marketplace Proves Unaffordable To Many,” The Washington Post, 2/1/14)

People That Don’t Qualify For ObamaCare Subsidies Or Receive Small Subsidies, The Cost Of Health Coverage Is “Overwhelming.” “But for those earning too much to qualify for federal financial help, the premiums can be overwhelming. A 60-year-old making $47,000 in Albany would have to pay a quarter of her income for the least expensive mid-level ‘silver’ policy, the level most consumers are buying.” (Jordan Rau, “In Rural Georgia, Federal Health Insurance Marketplace Proves Unaffordable To Many,” The Washington Post, 2/1/14)

  • After Selecting A Plan For Her Son, A Pottery Shop Owner In Rural Georgia Has Decided To Forego Insurance Coverage For Her And Her Husband As Rates On The ObamaCare Exchange Were Unaffordable. “Even some people who qualify for federal assistance, such as Stacie Brown, owner of a pottery shop, are balking. The cheapest ‘bronze’ plan for Brown, her husband and son would cost the family $300 a month but not begin paying medical bills until they exceeded the $6,300 individual deductible. The cheapest silver plan would cost $508 a month but not start paying until a $3,000 individual deductible was met. Her son’s pediatrician was not in any of the networks, and that was the one medical service she felt sure her family would use. Brown ultimately bought a $256-a-month Assurant Health plan for her son, sold outside the marketplace, which covers his pediatrician and unlimited office visits. She and her husband have decided to forgo coverage for themselves, even though they may face a tax penalty of $700. ‘I can’t afford the affordable health care,’ she said. ‘I don’t know anyone in this area who can afford it, and I do pretty well in life.’” (Jordan Rau, “In Rural Georgia, Federal Health Insurance Marketplace Proves Unaffordable To Many,”The Washington Post, 2/1/14)

 

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